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Nick Cave Frogs Meaning and Review 


"Frogs": A Haunting First Glimpse into Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' "Wild God"

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' latest single, "Frogs," is a haunting and evocative journey into the depths of human emotion. The song's eerie atmosphere, reminiscent of David Bowie's later work, is established through a mesmerizing blend of whirring synths, ethereal pads, and Cave's signature spoken-word delivery. The lyrics, inspired by the Old Testament story of Cain and Abel, paint a vivid picture of violence, guilt, and the yearning for redemption.


A Lyrical Tapestry of Violence, Guilt, and Redemption

Cave's vocals, oscillating between pleading whispers and authoritative pronouncements, serve as both a narrator and a participant in the song's unfolding drama. The lyrics, though sparse, are rich in symbolism and imagery. The opening lines, "Ushering in the week he knelt down / Crushed his brother's head in with a bone," immediately establish a sense of brutality and remorse. Yet, Cave's offer to "walk you home" suggests a glimmer of hope amidst the darkness.


A Chorus of Cleansing and Renewal

The song's chorus, with its repeated refrain of "In the Sunday rain," evokes a sense of cleansing and renewal. The image of frogs "leaping to God, amazed of love / And amazed of pain" is both surreal and strangely moving. It speaks to the paradoxical nature of human existence, where joy and suffering are inextricably intertwined.


A Sonic Landscape of Eerie Beauty

Musically, "Frogs" is built upon a simple yet powerful gospel progression. The sparse instrumentation allows Cave's vocals and lyrics to take center stage. The occasional bursts of guitar add a layer of texture and intensity, while the underlying synth textures create an otherworldly atmosphere.


A Haunting and Thought-Provoking Work

"Frogs" is a song that lingers in the mind long after it ends. Its enigmatic lyrics, haunting melodies, and unsettling atmosphere create a powerful emotional impact. It's a testament to Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' ability to explore the darkest corners of the human psyche while offering glimpses of hope and transcendence. Whether it's a harbinger of the sonic direction of their upcoming album "Wild God" remains to be seen, but "Frogs" stands as a compelling and thought-provoking work in its own right.


Listen to Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Frogs


Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Frogs Lyrics Meaning Explained

Frogs": Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Explore Guilt, Redemption, and the Cycle of Life

The meaning of Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds' "Frogs" is a multi-layered exploration of guilt, redemption, and the cyclical nature of life and death. The song's opening lines reference the biblical story of Cain and Abel, setting a tone of violence and remorse. The act of fratricide, the ultimate betrayal, becomes a metaphor for the human capacity for both darkness and the yearning for forgiveness.


Sunday Rain: A Symbol of Cleansing and Renewal

The song's chorus introduces the recurring motif of Sunday rain, symbolizing cleansing and renewal. The frogs, leaping in the gutters "amazed of love and amazed of pain," represent the duality of human experience, the simultaneous capacity for joy and suffering. They are "amazed to be back in the water again," suggesting a return to a primordial state, a baptism of sorts, where sins are washed away and hope is reborn.


A Plea for Peace and the Promise of Redemption

In the second verse, Cave's plea to "take that gun out of your hand" is a direct appeal for peace and non-violence. The mention of children in heaven "jumping for joy" contrasts with the earlier image of fratricide, hinting at the possibility of innocence and redemption. The line "all will be well say the bells" reinforces the theme of hope and the promise of a new beginning.


Cyclical Existence and the Search for Forgiveness

The outro is a poignant reflection on the song's central themes. The repetition of the phrase "amazed to be back in the water" emphasizes the cyclical nature of life and death, while the line "take that gun out of your hand" serves as a final plea for peace and reconciliation. The reference to Kris Kristofferson, a legendary singer-songwriter known for his outlaw image, adds a layer of complexity to the song's meaning, suggesting that even the most hardened souls can find redemption.


A Multi-Faceted Exploration of the Human Condition

"Frogs" is a song that invites multiple interpretations. It can be seen as a commentary on the violence and despair that plague modern society, a personal reflection on guilt and the search for forgiveness, or a spiritual meditation on the cyclical nature of existence. Ultimately, it is a testament to Nick Cave's ability to explore the darkest depths of the human soul while offering a glimmer of hope and the possibility of redemption.

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Frogs Lyrics

[Verse 1]

Ushering in the week he knelt down

Crushed his brother's head in with a bone

It's my great privilege

Oh babe, to walk you home


[Chorus]

In the Sunday rain

Hop inside my coat

In the Sunday rain

The frogs are jumping in the gutters

Uh, leaping to God, amazed of love

And amazed of pain

Amazed to be back in the water again

In the Sunday rain

In the Sunday rain

Gets you right down to your soul


[Verse 2]

Oh Lord, oh Lord

The children in the heavens

Jumping for joy, jumping for love

And opening the sky above

So, take that gun out of your hand

'Cause all will be well say the bells

It's Sunday morning and I'm holding your hand


[Outro]

Amazed of love and amazed of pain

Amazed to be back in the water

Back in the water again

Take that gun out of your hand

In the Sunday rain

Frogmarching you home, babe

Home to bed, yeah, in the Sunday rain

Take that gun out of your hand

Lord, kill me! In the Sunday rain

Kill me! Kill me! In the Sunday rain

Hop inside my coat

It's Sunday morning and I'm holding your hand

Frogmarching us home to a bed made of tears

Kris Kristofferson walks by kicking a can

In a shirt he hasn't washed for years

Hop inside my coat

Hop inside my coat


1 Comment


The Kristofferson reference is from his song "Sunday Morning Coming Down," where he refers to looking for his "cleanest dirty shirt" that's why Nick says he's wearing a shirt that hasn't been washed for years.

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